root labs rdist

January 28, 2013

History of memory corruption vulnerabilities and exploits

Filed under: Hacking,Security,Software engineering — Nate Lawson @ 5:12 am

I came across a great paper, “Memory Errors: The Past, the Present, and the Future” by van der Veen et al. The authors cover the history of memory corruption errors as well as exploitation and countermeasures. I think there are a number of interesting conclusions to draw from it.

It seems that the number of flaws in common software is still much too high. Consider what’s required to compromise today’s most hardened consumer platforms, iOS and Chrome. You need a flaw in the default install that is useful and remotely accessible, memory disclosure bug, sandbox bypass (or multiple ones), and often a kernel or other privilege escalation flaw.

Given a sufficiently small trusted computing base, it should be impossible to find this confluence of flaws. We clearly have too large a TCB today since this combination of flaws has been found not once, but multiple times in these hardened products. Other products that haven’t been hardened require even less flaws to compromise, making them more vulnerable even if they have the same rate of bug occurrence.

The paper’s conclusion shows that if you want to prevent exploitation, your priority should be preventing stack, heap, and integer overflows (in that order). Stack overflows are by far still the most commonly exploited class of memory corruption flaws, out of proportion to their prevalence.

We’re clearly not smart enough as a species to stop creating software bugs. It takes a Dan Bernstein to reason accurately about software in bite-sized chunks such as in qmail. It’s important to face this fact and make fundamental changes to process and architecture that will make the next 18 years better than the last.

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