root labs rdist

February 27, 2012

SSL optimization and security talk

Filed under: Crypto,Network,Protocols,Security — Nate Lawson @ 6:12 am

I gave a talk at Cal Poly on recently proposed changes to SSL. I covered False Start and Snap Start, both designed by Google engineer Adam Langley. Snap Start has been withdrawn, but there are some interesting design tradeoffs in these proposals that merit attention.

False Start provides a minor improvement over stock SSL, which takes two round trips in the initial handshake before application data can be sent. It saves one round trip on the initial handshake at the cost of sending data before checking for someone modifying the server’s handshake messages. It doesn’t provide any benefit on subsequent connections since the stock SSL resume protocol only takes one round trip also.

The False Start designers were aware of this risk, so they suggested the client whitelist ciphersuites for use with False Start. The assumption is that an attacker could get the client to provide ciphertext but wouldn’t be able to decrypt it if the encryption was secure. This is true most of the time, but is not sufficient.

The BEAST attack is a good example where ciphersuite whitelists are not enough. If a client used False Start as described in the standard, it couldn’t detect an attacker spoofing the server version in a downgrade attack. Thus, even if both the client and server supported TLS 1.1, which is secure against BEAST, False Start would have made the client insecure. Stock SSL would detect the version downgrade attack before sending any data and thus be safe.

The False Start standard (or at least implementations) could be modified to only allow False Start if the TLS version is 1.1 or higher. But this wouldn’t prevent downgrade attacks against TLS 1.1 or newer versions. You can’t both be proactively secure against the next protocol attack and use False Start. This may be a reasonable tradeoff, but it does make me a bit uncomfortable.

Snap Start removes both round trips for subsequent connections to the same server. This is one better than stock SSL session resumption. Additionally, it allows rekeying whereas session resumption uses the same shared key. The security cost is that Snap Start removes the server’s random contribution.

SSL is designed to fail safe. For example, neither party solely determines the nonce. Instead, the nonce is derived from both client and server randomness. This way, poor PRNG seeding by one of the participants doesn’t affect the final output.

Snap Start lets the client determine the entire nonce, and the server is expected to check it against a cache to prevent replay. There are measures to limit the size of the cache, but a cache can’t tell you how good the entropy is. Therefore, the nonce may be unique but still predictable. Is this a problem? Probably not, but I haven’t analyzed how a predictable nonce affects all the various operating modes of SSL (e.g., ECDH, client cert auth, SRP auth, etc.)

The key insight between both of these proposed changes to SSL is that latency is an important issue to SSL adoption, even with session resumption being built in from the beginning. Also, Google is willing to shift the responsibility for SSL security towards the client in order to save on latency. This makes sense when you own a client and your security deployment model is to ship frequent client updates. It’s less clear that this tradeoff is worth it for SSL applications besides HTTP or other security models.

I appreciate the work people like Adam have been doing to improve SSL performance and security. Obviously, unprotected HTTP is worse than some reductions in SSL security. However, careful study is needed for the many users of these kinds of protocol changes before their full impact is known. I remain cautious about adopting them.

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 83 other followers